Joan Miró – “An assassination of painting”

Joan Miró. The Two Philosophers. 1936. Oil on copper, 14 x 19 5/8 (35.6 x 49.8 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago

Joan Miró. The Two Philosophers. 1936. Oil on copper, 14 x 19 5/8" (35.6 x 49.8 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago

Joan Miró i Ferrà (April 20, 1893 – December 25, 1983) was an Spanish painter, sculptor and ceramist born in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

Joan Miró. Head of a Man

Joan Miró. Head of a Man. 1935. Oil and vernis on cardboard glued to wood panel. 104.5 x 74.2 cm. Musée National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France.

Earning international acclaim, his work has been interpreted as Surrealism, a sandbox for the subconscious mind, a re-creation of the childlike, and a manifestation of Catalan pride. In numerous interviews dating from the 1930s onwards, Miró expressed contempt for conventional painting methods as a way of supporting bourgeoise society, and famously declared an “assassination of painting” in favor of upsetting the visual elements of established painting.

Joan Miró, Wikipedia

Women and Bird in the Moonlight Women and Bird in the Moonlight, Joan Miró 1949

Women and Bird in the Moonlight Women and Bird in the Moonlight, Joan Miró 1949

“Throughout the time in which I am working on a canvas I can feel how I am beginning to love it, with that love which is born of slow comprehension. “

— Joan Miró

Joan Miró: Painting and Anti-Painting 1927–1937 November 2, 2008–January 12, 2009

View the online exhibition at the MOMA

Joan Miró - 1983, sculpture

Joan Miró - 1983, sculpture

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